Double Back Stitch, AKA Inverse Herringbone Stitch

Rissa Peace Root 2005

   
Home - Articles  - Readers' Showcase  - Novices - Search-
This is my favorite method of doing shadow work, because I can be certain that the stitches on top are in the right place and that I do not accidentally leave any gaps. Also, it is the only method that works with an already pieced CQ block.

I created each of these diagrams to help demonstrate the stitch, along with a narrative explaining what you should be doing.  The page may take about a minute to load, because of the number of graphics, but I wanted them to be large enough to be clear.

Key:  

  • Black lines represent back stitches on top of the fabric
  • Grey lines represent stitches carried across the back of the fabric (which form a herringbone pattern)
  • Red dots represent needle holes
You start with your line drawing, also referred to as a design element.
Your first stitch would begin on the top side of the design element one stitch length from the end. (There is no hard and fast rule about where to begin, but most people work left to right.) Bring your needle from the back side up at approximately where the first red dot is placed.
You will be coming back down into the fabric at the point of this design element to make your first back stitch.
When you have pulled the thread through, your first stitch will be completed.
Come back up through the fabric on the opposite side of the design element roughly parallel to the starting point for the first stitch.  This creates the first *shadow* stitch.
Go back down through the fabric in the same hole made by your first back stitch.  You now have the first two back stitches in place.
Come back up through the fabric one stitch length away from the first stitch on the top part of the design.  Notice that the thread behind shows through.
Complete the back stitch, by inserting your needle in the same hole as the first stitch.
Bring your thread back up on the opposite side of the design element to start the next back stitch. You can start to see the herringbone stitch that is forming on the back side of the fabric.
Complete the back stitch, bring your thread across the back, and come up again on the opposite side to start the next one.
Complete the back stitch, bring your thread across the back, and come up again on the opposite side to start the next one.
And so on.
And so on.
And so on.
And so on.
And so on.
And so on.
And so on.
And so on.
And so on.
This time, you will complete the back stitch then come up at the convergence point of the design element.
Complete the back stitch and then come up at the convergence point of the design element again.
Make your last back stitch.  Your design element is now outlined in a double row of back stitches and the herring bone has been created on the back side while you were working the back stitches from side to side, creating a "shadow" that can be seen through the fabric.
 
Home - Articles  - Readers' Showcase  - Novices - Search-
[an error occurred while processing this directive]